Bullfighting Museum in Cordoba: Worth a Visit?

Bullfighting Museum in Cordoba: Worth a Visit?

While visiting Andalucia, it’s almost impossible to avoid the topic of bullfighting.

I mean nearly every city has its own bullring with a small museum inside, and some even boast dedicated museums paying tribute to this age-old Spanish tradition.

Whatever your reason may be for visiting the one in Cordoba, I hope this article will give you a good idea of what you can expect.

But let’s get the important question out of the way.

Is it Worth a Visit?

A disclaimer on my part – while I respect the cultural heritage of Southern Spain, I think torturing animals and calling it a sport is something I can never agree with.

I would never pay to see this live in a bullring, but I have no problem visiting a museum to learn more about where this tradition originates and how it impacted the local culture and lives.

If you have the same goal, I think you will learn more by visiting an actual bullring with a small museum attached to it, like the one in Ronda. The museum in Cordoba feels very static, all the artifacts removed from the surroundings take away from the experience.

On top of that, all the information and text were only in Spanish, so clearly international tourists were not the intended audience for this place.

If you have a limited time in Cordoba, or visiting only for one day, I would certainly skip the visit to the museum.

What Can You See Inside

The ground floor doesn’t have any displays and most of it is located on the top floor. The building itself is very pretty, an old palatial house from 16th century.

As you stroll through, you’ll find a rich collection of artifacts that offer a deeper understanding of the taurine world, taking you closer to the heartbeat of Spanish culture.

As Cordoba is one of the cradles of bullfighting, it was possible to collect all the relevant artifacts belonging to the five bullfighting Calips and display them in the museum. The five caliphs are: Lagartijo, Guerrita, Machaquito, Manolete and Manuel Benítez, El Cordobés.

The museum also offers a collection of contemporary photographs, bullfighters’ suits, old posters for bullfights, recordings, bullfighting equipment, sculptures and paintings.

The museum sheds light on the evolution of bullfighting, offering a chance to witness the transformation from a royal sport to a public spectacle, revealing the colorful and sometimes controversial history of bullfighting.

Virtual Tour of the Bullfighting Museum of Cordoba

Below is a short photography tour of the museum. As I was visiting with my kids and there was no information available in English, it was a pretty brief visit. I think we spent about 30 minutes checking the exhibits.

At the end of the article you will find details on location, opening times & entrance fees.

Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain
Museo Torino in Cordoba, Andalucia, Spain

Bullfighting Museum of Cordoba (Museo Taurino)

Location: Plaza Maimonides, very close to the Cardinal Salazar Hospital, Cordoba

Opening Times: Winter time opening hours: Tuesday to Friday from 8.30 am to 8.45 pm, Saturdays from 8.30 am to 4.30 pm, and Sundays & holidays from 8.30 am to 2.30 pm. Summer time: Tuesday to Saturday 8.30 am to 3 pm, Sundays and holidays 8.30 am to 2.30 pm, Mondays closed.

Entrance Tickets: 4 euros for adults, 2 euros for kids. You can get the tickets at the museum, no need to book in advance.

Accessibility: you have to take the stairs to the first floor, after that there is a lift available. This is ok for families with prams, but if you’re in a wheelchair you won’t be able to get in.

Explore More in Cordoba

Visiting the Mezquita Cathedral in Cordoba

Palacio de Viana, Cordoba

La Casa Andalusí: The Hidden Gem of Córdoba

Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos, Cordoba

Southern Spain Travel Tips

Find Best Hotels

Find Hotels

I have been using booking.com for all my trips in Spain and abroad, and it’s the best place to book your hotel.

Find Car Rental

Find Car Rental

To rent a car, I highly recommend Discover Cars, an award-winning price comparison site for car rentals.

Book Your Tour

Local travel companies offer many day trip options from almost all the destinations in Southern Spain. You can check them out here.

Book Local Transport

To get the cheapest bus or train tickets, take a look at Omio to find the timetables and prices.

Find Cheap Flights

Get the best flight deals when you book early via Skyscanner.com

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links - if you decide to book using one of the links, I will earn a small commission that helps me run this site. This is at no extra cost to you.

Hi, I'm Lucia

At Viva La Vita, I will help you to discover Southern Spain like a local!

I've been living on Costa del Sol since 2020, and fill these pages with first-hand insights, personal experience and practical tips that will help you plan a wonderful trip to Spain.

Make yourself at home and find the best places to explore in Andalusia and beyond.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.